• Study References

Study References

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32. Desai M, Gutman J, L'Lanziva A, et al. Intermittent screening and treatment or intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine versus intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine- pyrimethamine for the control of malaria during pregnancy in western Kenya: an open-label, three-group, randomised controlled superiority trial. Lancet. 2015; 386:2507-19.
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35. Poespoprodjo JR, Fobia W, Kenangalem E, et al. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment of multidrug resistant falciparum and vivax malaria in pregnancy. PloS one. 2014; 9:e84976.
36. Pekyi D, Ampromfi AA, Tinto H, et al. Four Artemisinin-Based Treatments in African Pregnant Women with Malaria. N Engl J Med. 2016; 374:913-27.
37. Desai M, Gutman J, L'Lanziva A, et al. Intermittent screening and treatment or intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine versus intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine- pyrimethamine for the control of malaria during pregnancy in western Kenya: an open-label, three-group, randomised controlled superiority trial. Lancet. 2015.